Tag Archives: Lost Film Foundation

Album review: Lost Film Foundation – ‘(the big light)’

Lost Film Foundation

To be honest, it came out quite a while back. Just before Christmas if memory serves.

But (the big light) still deserves some attention. It’s the sole album from a now defunct band called Lost Film Foundation, released post-split.

Matt Kilda (once known as Lupen Crook) fronted the band with Jemimah Dean sharing vocal duties. The sound switches from the simplest of melodies to glorious, discordant racket while the lyrics paint portraits of inner turmoils at their most chaotic.

Read on for more…

A Medway Christmas Alphabet: W is for ‘World’s End’

‘Tis the festive season of advent calendars and countdowns to Christmas. To mark the occasion, what better way than to have a completely non-festive A-Z of Medway songs.

Lupen Crook - Pros and Cons

My introduction to Lupen Cook came in the form of songs like ‘Dorothy Deserves’ and ‘Lest We Connect’, songs which revel in a macabre disarray and manic chaos.

And there’s much to like in the songs: fantastically, imaginative tunes full of fast moving musical ideas and lyrics spat out with machine-gunfire rapidity.

But for all the allure of the havoc and disorder, it’s the songs which slow down, pull back and mull things over which make the more lasting impression.

Certainly this is the case with the songs from Waiting for the Post-Man which Lupen Crook recorded as a solo, largely acoustic project – a means by which to grieve over the loss of his close friend, Matthew Stephens-Scott. It’s a beautiful, beautiful album, openly honest with its heart carved out on its wrist.

‘World’s End’, from that album’s predecessor, The Pros and Cons of Eating Out, comes from a time before Stephens-Scott’s death; he even contributed a lyric to another song on the record. But, amidst all the whirlwindery of ‘Dorothy Deserves’ and ‘Lest We Forget’, it too gives itself time to meditate – to take a break from all the disarray and discord.

The song is a reflection on the chaos. ‘It’s just here I realise the beast I have become,’ he admits at one point. He’s been ‘thinking dark and desperate things’. Elsewhere, there’s the realisation that he’s been ‘missing out on the best years of this life’. Most telling are lines speaking of how:

One day I’ll find the heart
And with the aid of only madness, wonder when that day will start
A storm so revealing that my thick skin might shed.

Such lyrics betray a quest for sanity: the need to be at peace. Later in Lupen Crook’s catalogue of songs, would come the realisation that being ‘perfectly imperfect’ (‘Note to Self’ from British Folk Tales) might be something to accept and move on with.

But here, in ‘World’s End’, the search has not yet finished. It has, though, uncovered some beautiful gems along the way.

Find out more about Lupen Crook and plenty of other Medway musicians in my book, Do it Yourself: a History of Music in Medway.

You can buy ‘World’s End’ from iTunes. Find out more about Lupen Crook’s current project, The Lost Film Foundation on their Facebook page.